Wednesday, December 09, 2015


Dr. Sharyn Jones’ New Book Released: 

“The Domesticated Penis: How Womanhood Shaped Manhood”

http://www.amazon.com/Domesticated-Penis-Womanhood-Shaped-Manhood/dp/0817318747/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1449671772&sr=8-1&keywords=Sharyn+Jones



"The Domesticated Penis is a study of the anatomical
distinctiveness of the genitals of the human male and diverse cultural
attitudes toward them and their symbolism. This is scholarship at its
liveliest: a colorful, knowledgeable romp through history and across
cultures and species, to explore how the penis we know and (mostly) love
 today developed its characteristic shape, size, physiology, and
behavior. The core argument is evolutionary: ancient women knew what
they wanted, and what they wanted was smooth, substantial, long-lasting
penetration. Male anatomy evolved to match female desire."

 

  -Beth A. Conklin, author of Consuming Grief: Compassionate Cannibalism in
an Amazonian Society





Sharyn Jones' Research:  http://reu-fiji.org/


Dr. Sharyn Jones: https://artscience.nku.edu/departments/sapdept/anthropology/faculty/sharyn-jones.html

Tuesday, December 01, 2015


NSF REU Fiji Fellows Participate in Public Outreach and Education at the Baker Hunt Arts and Cultural Center

This August NSF REU Fiji Fellows went to the Baker Hunt Arts Cultural Center to help educate those interested in their research in Fiji.



The people of the islands of Fiji depend on the ocean for their everyday needs. This summer 6 students from Northern Kentucky University lived in the small village of Nasinu, located in Natewa Bay on the island of Vanua Levu. They sought  to understand the way Fijians use the Bay's reef systems. The students conducted ethnography, the study of another culture through direct participation and observation. Through a series of interviews, participation in daily activities, and the observation of daily village life, the team learned about the use of the ocean and how this has been affected by an increased reliance on fishing over a series of decades. Meet with the team and learn about a Fijian way of life from interactive stations about traditional ecological knowledge.



Learn more about the NSF REU Fiji project at: http://reu-fiji.org/
The Baker Arts and Cultural Center website:  http://bakerhunt.org

Thursday, July 02, 2015

The Nautilus Publishes a Story on NSF REU Fiji Research

The Nautilus published a story recently, by author Meehan Cristi, about the NSF REU Fiji Research Program conducted by Jones, NKU students, and a conservation biologist from Columbia University (NY), Dr. Josh Drew.





The author of this article, Meehan Cristi, visited the remote site with Dr. Josh Drew in the summer of 2014.  She interview Sharyn Jones and her NKU student about the ecological impact on marine life by the local Fijians who use rely on it regularly for sustenance.


Jones on Vanua Levu



To access the full article, please follow the link below:

http://nautil.us/blog/can-new-research--old-traditions-save-fiji-from-ecological-collapse